Starstuff

Meteor showers in July

How to See Meteor Showers This Summer – http://wp.me/p6v59E-v

The showers

First to appear are the Capricornids on about July 10. This shower peaks on Saturday (July 25) and ends on Aug. 15. Under the best conditions, only a few bright meteors per hour come from this stream, so you’ll hardly know it is in progress unless you plot meteor trails on a star map and trace them back to their common intersection point; most of the meteors you’ll see will be sporadic ones or members of another shower.
The Capricornids’ radiant reaches its highest point — about 30 degrees up in the southern sky — at about 2 a.m. local daylight time on July 25. The waxing gibbous moon will have set about an hour before then, leaving the rest of the night dark for prospective meteor watchers.
Next come the Delta Aquarids, which last from July 12 to Aug. 23. This is July’s most prolific shower, with up to three dozen meteors visible per hour under ideal conditions during the maximum on July 27.
The Delta Aquarid shower has a double radiant, indicating that we are seeing two distinct streams of celestial debris burning up in Earth’s atmosphere. The meteors are mostly faint, with just 5 to 10 percent leaving persistent trails. These shooting stars move at slow or medium speeds because they are coming in sideways across Earth’s orbit.
On peak night this year, the double radiant will be highest — roughly 40 degrees above the southern horizon — at 3:30 a.m. local time. The bright gibbous moon will have set about 80 minutes earlier in the night, so there will be about 100 minutes of dark-sky time before dawn breaks.
The final shower reaching maximum this month is the Piscis Australid, which lasts from July 10 through Aug. 10 and peaks on July 30. This is a lesser stream; only about eight meteors per hour are seen under the best conditions to observers in the Southern Hemisphere, where the radiant — near the bright star Fomalhaut — climbs high in the sky. The nearly full moon will wreck any chances of getting a decent view this year, unfortunately.
Another weak shower is the Alpha Capricornids,which begin about July 3, peak on Aug. 2 and end on Aug. 15. The radiant reaches its highest point (about 30 degrees high in the southern sky) about 1 a.m. local time. Though they produce only about five meteors per hour, the Alpha Capricornids are photogenic, frequently producing bright-yellow fireballs that can be quite spectacular. Sadly, the bright moon, 95 percent illuminated, is not too far away in nearby Aquarius and will seriously impact the peak of this year’s display.
The last minor shower before the Perseids is the Iota Aquarids, a two-radiant shower having detectable meteors from July 15 to Aug. 25. At peak activity on Aug. 6, only about six members per hour are seen under good conditions; the radiants are at their highest point, about 40 degrees in the southern sky, at 2:30 a.m. local time. A waning gibbous moon halfway up in the east-northeast sky will interfere, to an extent, with viewing these meteors.
The dramatic Perseid meteor shower is predicted to reach its peak this year on the morning of Aug. 13. The Perseids’ radiant lies near the border of the constellations Perseus and Cassiopeia, not far from the famous Double Cluster in Perseus. It rises at dusk and is highest in the sky — nearly overhead — at 5:40 a.m. local time.
When the Perseids’ maximum occurs in a dark sky, as will be the case this year, this rich stream offers a crescendo averaging more than 50 meteors per hour, though double this rate has been seen on occasion. Many flaring meteors with trails are seen. The Perseids normally extend from July 17 through Aug. 24.
The last summer shower is the Kappa Cygnids, which runs from Aug. 19 to Aug. 22 and peaks on Aug. 21.

Your views are important,we want to hear your take as well.

Author:Gary Wellings

Lifeonachangingplanet.wordpress.com
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Focusplanetearth.wordpress.com
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Twitter @sunburst2014

Worry often gives a small thing a big shadow.

“The journey is what brings us happiness not the destination.”
― It’s another beautiful day on the Bay Of Quinte – Z

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Starstuff

A Rose made from Galaxies

A rose made of galaxies [3946 x 4000] via /r/spaceporn http://ift.tt/1Ij2DzAhttp://wp.me/pR4uf-cJj

Your views are important,we want to hear your take as well.

Author:Gary Wellings

Lifeonachangingplanet.wordpress.com
Bloggypost.wordpress.com
Theoreticaldecisions.wordpress.com
Climatechange911.wordpress.com
Focusplanetearth.wordpress.com
EarthCrackedUp.wordpress.com
Twitter @sunburst2014

Worry often gives a small thing a big shadow.

“The journey is what brings us happiness not the destination.”
― It’s another beautiful day on the Bay Of Quinte – Z

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THE LAB

Sell Phone Kids Prompts

Sell phone kids are getting so they don’t pick up a book to read anymore.
Facebooking gets to be a bad habit,so what good is a dead battery without a good book to snuggle up with.
Writing your favourite bloggy post is enlightening to say the least.

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So what’s happening on our changing planet?

Your views are important,we want to hear your take as well.

Author:Gary Wellings

Lifeonachangingplanet.wordpress.com
Bloggypost.wordpress.com
Theoreticaldecisions.wordpress.com
Climatechange911.wordpress.com
Focusplanetearth.wordpress.com
EarthCrackedUp.wordpress.com
Twitter @sunburst2014

Worry often gives a small thing a big shadow.

“The journey is what brings us happiness not the destination.”
― It’s another beautiful day on the Bay Of Quinte – Z

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Science Club, SPEAKING OUT, THE LAB

Robotics Sessions In Timmins Public Schools are Gender Biased ?

Timmins,Ontario public library NOT allowing girls to participate in the robotics session!

Sign Cash’s petition

Allow girls to participate in the robotics session!

Cash Cayen Timmins, Canada

Sign Cash’s Petition Here

Because today I tried to register for the robotics session that our local library is offering and was refused based on the fact that I am a girl. Even after speaking to the Assistant Library Director Elaine De Bonis, where I explained that I have been participating in library programming since I was only a few months old I was still turned away. Mrs De Bonis explained to me that boys academic and literacy skills don’t improve over the summer break therefore this program would only be offered to boys. She said I could be added to a waiting list and if enough girls showed interest they could possibly look into offering it to girls in the future. I explained that it was unfair that I was being denied this opportunity simply because I am a girl, but she insisted I could not register.

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Tune in or sound off in the comments,we want to hear your take as well.

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Lifeonachangingplanet.wordpress.com
Bloggypost.wordpress.com
Theoreticaldecisions.wordpress.com
Climatechange911.wordpress.com
Focusplanetearth.wordpress.com
EarthCrackedUp.wordpress.com
Twitter @sunburst2014

Worry often gives a small thing a big shadow.

Edward Snowden is an American Hero !!!!!!!!!!

“The journey is what brings us happiness not the destination.”
― It’s another beautiful day on the Bay Of Quinte – Z

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